Static statistics and security stacked for VoIP

Google Logo
Hosted VoIP is a superior communication tool when compared to yelling

Although the common fear of adopting a hosted VoIP system for a business is that the call quality will suffer, the truth is that voice quality is great on these systems. The reasoning behind these illusions is simple: We've all had that Skype or Google Voice call that went on interminably with a whole series of missed signals, garbled words and long interruptions in response time from friends and/or family across the ocean. But the difference between a hosted VoIP service and a peer-to-peer voice chat is the same as delivering mail through the Post Office and writing down messages on paper airplanes. Communication is much easier when you have someone to help carry your messages for you.

No need for the postman
Through the use of hosted VoIP services, it is possible for workers to communicate loudly and clearly with each other, static-free, in a variety of mobile platforms, according to TMCnet​ contributor Mae Kowalke. An additional advantage pointed out in that article is that hosted VoIP systems have inherently more secure structures. This is thanks to the diligent hands of those running the service having a dedicated security team to make sure that nothing that can go wrong, does go wrong. The ability to specialize in security really pays off when it comes to encrypting highly confidential business conversations

Strong protocols
Of course, part of security simply involves maintaining strong security protocols for employees in the office. Most of this stuff should be standard operation procedure for companies of any size, but people are lax about passwords when they don't feel like they're in danger. Make sure that your passwords aren't "12345" or "password" or "default" as a precautionary measure, then demand that workers rotate passwords throughout the year. This is a pain for everyone, but it is less trouble than everyone having to go and find new jobs because a security breach leaked every single client's credit card number and personal information over the entire Internet.

Over at No Jitter, Andrew Prokop recommends that the physical components of your communication system be set aside from the rest of your network, which is a smart move. Encryption, passwords and strong protocols are necessary to keep a business from becoming hacker chum. In order to see a better, safer Internet for tomorrow, do everyone a favor and get your workers to go along with better security today.

About the author: